Information

Moses in a basket plant care

Moses in a basket plant care



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Tradescantia are climbing or trailing plants which will thrive indoors in good light. They are also known by other names: spider-lily, cradle-lily, oyster-plant and flowering inch plant. The stems trail to about 60cm or more. Tradescantia spathacea 'Versicolor' syn. Tradescantia spathacea 'Tricolor', Rhoeo spathacea 'Tricolor'.

Content:
  • Plant Finder Tool
  • Moses In Cradle Care: How to Grow Moses Plant
  • Moses-in-the-Cradle - Tradescantia Spathacea
  • How to Care for a Moses Plant
  • Moses in the Cradle plants need bright, indirect light
  • What Is This Houseplant? (Tradescantia spathacea)
  • Help my Moses in the Cradle
  • Moses-in-the-cradle (Tradescantia spathacea or Rhoeo) – Plant
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Plant Care for Moses-in-the-Cradle

Plant Finder Tool

A Moses in the Cradle plant grows beautifully both as an outdoor plant and as a colorful indoor plant. It is the same family as the popular Wandering Jew plant and the spiderwort.

Whichever name you decide to call these colorful plants, native to Mexico, the West Indies, Guatemala, and Central America, they are easy to care for and grow well both as an outdoor plant in temperate climates and as a houseplant. You can use the stem cuttings to propagate a new Mosses in the Cradle plant. A Moses in the Cradle plant is easily recognized by its rosettes of long, lance shaped, waxy leaves with vibrant , purple undersides.

The leaves come out from the bottom of the plant, just above the ground. The most popular varieties sold have leaves that are green, or a mixture of green, white, and purple stripes. A Moses in the Cradle plant is grown for its vibrantly colored leaves rather than its small, three petaled, white flowers.Keep an eye out for spider mites , that could drain the color from the leaves, and mealy bugs that often hide inside the clumps of leaves.

A Moses in the Cradle plant is considered poisonous and toxic to cats, dogs, and small children. A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants. A Moses in the Cradle plant needs very bright light Very few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade.

A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. A high light area has over ft. If the plant gets less than hours a day of bright light Very few houseplants should be placed in direct sun.

Before watering a Moses in the Cradle plant, allow the top few inches of soil to dry out. Keep the soil drier during the winter months, when all houseplants, not just a Moses in the Cradle plant, are not actively growing. The plant does not require plant food during the autumn and winter. Moses in the Cradle plants prefer high humidity which is often not available in our homes, especially during the winter months. There are few things you can do to increase the humidity around your plants.

Place a small humidifier nearby. Place your Moses in the Cradle plant on a tray of wet pebbles. Be sure the plant is sitting on the pebbles and not in the water. Grouping plants together creates a mini greenhouse effect and increases the humidity. I'm not a fan of misting plants since is not that beneficial and often encourages pests and diseases.

A Moses in the Cradle plant produces small, three petaled, white flowers tucked inside purple, boat shaped spathes.Spider mites and Mealy Bugs Learn how to identify and treat Mealy Bugs, a houseplant pest that leaves sticky, white, cottony residue on houseplants. You can see a picture of these insects and learn how to treat them in the Glossary of the website. Because a Moses in the Cradle plant likes high humidity, root rot caused by the plant roots staying wet too long and Leaf Spot Disease How to identify and treat Leaf Spot plant disease.

See a picture of Leaf Spot disease and learn how to prevent leaf spot disease from attacking your plants. A Moses in the Cradle plant grows best in a loose potting soil that retains moisture yet drains quickly.

This type of soil prevents the roots from saying wet too long and developing root rot. A good time to repot a Moses in the Cradle plant is in the spring but only if the roots have filled the existing pot. When re-potting any houseplant, always use the next size pot and nothing larger. There must be drip holes in the bottom of the pot so excess water can escape. I recommend vigorously pruning a Moses in the Cradle plant during the spring to keep the plant looking full and bushy.

Always wear gloves when pruning since the sap ion a Moses in the Cradle plant is toxic and very irritating. You can use the Stem Cuttings Learn how to propagate plants using stem cuttings, leaf cuttings, cane cuttings, and branch cuttings.

Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be.

Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions.If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched, immediately call the Poison Control CenterIt's possible for an allergic reaction to occur from contact with any houseplant, toxic or non-toxic. Level 2: Houseplants with medium to severe toxicity. Eating parts of these houseplants may result in vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties.

Level 3: These houseplants are very poisonous. When eaten, especially in large quantities, severe vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties can occur. Level 4: These houseplants are extremely poisonous. Eating parts of these houseplants can be be life threatening.

Every plant listed in our Popular HousePlant guide has a section explaining whether or not it is toxic and, if so, how dangerous it is. Amaryllis, alocasia, dieffenbachias, crotons, ivies, azaleas, lilies, and philodendrons are just a few of the highly poisonous plants we use in our homes and offices all of the time. If you don't know whether your houseplant can pose a threat, send an email to Ask Judy HousePlant Include a picture of your plant and a description. Judy will let you know if the houseplant should be kept away from small children and pets.

The sap can causes severe pain if it gets in the mouth or eyes and skin irritations. A Moses in the Cradle plant is toxic to cats, dogs, and small children so please keep this colorful plant out of reach. Do you know the name of a type of Moses in the Cradle plant that has striped leaves?

There is a new variety of Moses in the Cradle plant called Rhoea discolor 'Variegata. Why do the purple and green leaves on my Moses in the Cradle plant look so pale.

The color used to be so vivid. There could be several things going on. If your Moses in the Cradle plant is sitting in direct sun, the intense direct light may cause the color in the leaves to fade.If your plant is not getting enough indirect bright light Very few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. The most serious cause would be an infestation of Spider Mites. Depending upon how severe the infestation is, you can use these ingredients in varying proportions.

If there are only a few pests, dip a Q-tip in alcohol and gently swab them off. For a more widespread problem, start by using a spray of warm water mixed with a few tablespoons of biodegradable soap. Spray all areas of the plant. Use this solution on leathery leafed plants except palms , never on fuzzy leafed plants like African Violets or Begonias. For palms, omit the alcohol from the Green Solution.

Why are the ends of the leaves on my Moses in the Cradle plants turning brown? The ends of the leave of your Moses in the Cradle Plant are turning brown because there is not enough humidity in the air around the plant.

You can put a small humidifier next to your plant or place itt on a wet pebble tray. Be sure the plant is sitting on pebbles and not in the water.


Moses In Cradle Care: How to Grow Moses Plant

Click to see full answer. Moreover, how do you care for Moses in the cradle? Allow the top inch or two of soil to dry out before watering. Keep the soil drier during the winter when all houseplants, not just a Moses in the Cradle , are not actively growing.

You only need to feed the plant monthly during the growing season—spring and summer. The best type of fertilizer to use is a balanced houseplant fertilizer.

Moses-in-the-Cradle - Tradescantia Spathacea

Add To My Wish List. Spacing: 18 inches. Hardiness Zone: 8b. This selection is an excellent plant for indoor containers and baskets; a year-round bloomer with beautiful white flower clusters nestled in purple bracts; dense mounded foliage is mid-green and attractive; easy to care for. Moses In The Cradle features showy cymes of white flowers with purple bracts at the ends of the stems from early spring to late winter.Its sword-like leaves remain dark green in color with curious purple undersides throughout the year. This is an herbaceous evergreen houseplant with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other indoor plants with less refined foliage. This plant may benefit from an occasional pruning to look its best. When grown indoors, Moses In The Cradle can be expected to grow to be about 12 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches.

How to Care for a Moses Plant

Add To My Wish List. Spacing: 18 inches. Hardiness Zone: 8. This selection is an excellent plant for indoor applications; a year-round bloomer with white flower clusters nestled in purple bracts; interesting foliage is green and white striped with purple undersides; easy to care for. Variegated Moses In The Cradle features showy cymes of white flowers with purple bracts at the ends of the stems from early spring to late winter.

Hailing from Mexico, this beautiful plant has long slender, upward reaching leaves that boast a sunny-yellow, green, white, and pink variegated top and a deep purple underside. This Tradescantia prefers bright, indirect light and drying out partially between waterings.

Moses in the Cradle plants need bright, indirect light

The Garden Helper is a free gardening encyclopedia and guides to growing and caring for gardens, plants and flowers. Helping gardeners grow their dreams sinceNo-dash-here, you've found The Real Garden Helper! Gardening on the Web sinceShare your gardening knowledge with The Gardener's Forum - with 50, posts and thousands of participating members.

What Is This Houseplant? (Tradescantia spathacea)

Our website uses cookies. We use cookies to provide you with a better service on our websites. You are free to manage this via your browser setting at any time. To learn more about how we use the cookies, please see our cookies policy. Toggle navigation.By size 0cm - 9cm 10cm - 19cm 20cm - 29cm 30cm - 39cm 40cm - 49cm 50cm - 59cm 60cm - 69cm 70cm - 79cm 80cm - 89cm 90cm plus. Perfect for gifting Indoor plant gifts Outdoor plant gifts Gifts for the garden Gifts for the home Gifts for her Gifts for him.

Moses in the Cradle Plant - Care, Growing, Watering, Flowering, Propagation - Plant Index - The indoor plant garden gives those without.

Help my Moses in the Cradle

Add To My Wish List. Spacing: 18 inches. Hardiness Zone: 8b.

Moses-in-the-cradle (Tradescantia spathacea or Rhoeo) – Plant

RELATED VIDEO: Tradescantia - Moses in the Cradle / Oyster Plant Propagation u0026 Care Tips

Tradescantia pallida is a tender evergreen perennial native to northeast Mexico from Tamaulipas to Yucatan grown as an ornamental for its striking purple foliage. Originally named Setcreasea pallida by Joseph Nelson Rose in , it was reclassified in the genus Tradescantia by D. Hunt of the Royal Botanic Garden Kew inThe former name S. The small, pale purple flowers are borne on the ends of the stems.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

I got this at the store with no tag on it. It was too pretty to leave behind and I'm wondering what it is and how I should care for it. Any suggestions are welcome! Looks like a Moses in the Cradle. It requires very little care or maintenance and will thrive if planted in a suitably bright, sheltered location. However, it does benefit from regular feeding during the summer to encourage abundant foliage growth and a healthy, productive root system.

I earn a commission if you make a purchase through my referral links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. You might wonder where the name of Moses in the Cradle comes from.